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The laws in Australia have evolved from the English common law offense of rape, but have gradually changed, especially in the late 20th century.

This stands in contrast to reported rape rate of 1.2 per 100,000 in Japan, 1.8 per 100,000 in India, 4.6 rapes per 100,000 in Bahrain, 12.3 per 100,000 in Mexico, 24.1 per 100,000 in United Kingdom, 28.6 per 100,000 in United States, 66.5 per 100,000 in Sweden, and the world's highest rate of 114.9 rapes per 100,000 in South Africa.

This examination has its origin in the country's British colonial-era laws dating back to 1872. More than 100 experts, including doctors, lawyers, police, and women's rights activists, signed a joint statement in 2013 asking for the test, which they called "demeaning", to be abolished, as it "does not provide any evidence that is relevant to proving the offence." The United Nations Multi-country Study on Men and Violence asked men in rural and urban Bangladesh if they had forced a woman to have sex at any point in their lives.

Research on male-male and female-male is beginning to be done.However, almost no research has been done on female-female rape, though women can be charged with rape in a few jurisdictions.It does not, and of course cannot, include cases of rape which go unreported or unrecorded.It does not specify whether recorded means reported, brought to trial, or convicted.Statistics on rape and other sexual assaults are commonly available in industrialized countries, and are becoming more common throughout the world.

Inconsistent definitions of rape, different rates of reporting, recording, prosecution and conviction for rape create controversial statistical disparities, and lead to accusations that many rape statistics are unreliable or misleading.Rape victims in the country face a double risk of being subjected to violence: on one hand they can become victims of honor killings perpetrated by their families, and on the other hand they can be victimized by the laws of the country: they can be charged with adultery, a crime that can be punishable by death.Furthermore, they can be forced by their families to marry their rapist.Article 336 of the Penal Code stipulates that rape is a punishable offence, but does not give a definition of rape (which is left to the courts).The lack of a clear definition of rape in Algerian law makes it difficult for women to report the act and seek legal remedies.82% of rural Bangladeshi and 79% of urban Bangladeshi men cited entitlement as their reason for rape.