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Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and outline the components of an information system; diagram and describe the hardware components of a computer system; identify and appraise common systems and application software, including operating systems; summarize how the Internet, Intranet, and Extranet work, and differentiate between them; categorize and explain the components of a telecommunications system; diagram and explain decision support systems and other specialized information systems; describe the process of software development and management tools used in the software development process; break down why information systems use the database approach to data management; evaluate the impact of information technology on society and privacy; and summarize the basics of programming and steps in the programming process.Major topics include: information systems in organizations; hardware and systems technology; systems software and application software; Internet, Intranet, and Extranet; network systems technology; enterprise business systems; decision support systems; specialized information systems; systems development; data management; business, social, and ethical issues; and programming.

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Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: evaluate and disclose financial information for transactions involving fixed and intangible assets; assess accounting for securities and investments by preparing entries and properly recording financial information under a variety of different scenarios; analyze financial information for transactions as they apply to current liabilities and contingencies; evaluate financial information for transactions involving bonds and notes payable; prepare and describe transactions about a company’s leases, for both operating leases and capital leases; record transactions and prepare proper financial information as it pertains to stockholder equity transactions and comprehensive income; calculate corporate income and account for corporate income taxes; explain the different type of entries and financial disclosures required for pension plans and related post-retirement benefits, such as medical insurance; and consider a variety of accounting changes and error types found on the financial statements, including prospective and retrospective-type disclosures.Topics include: accounting for fixed and intangible assets; accounting for securities and investments; accounting for liabilities and contingencies; accounting for bonds and notes payable; accounting for operating and capital leases; accounting for shareholder equity and comprehensive income; cash flow statements and disclosures; accounting for corporate income taxes; pensions and post-retirement benefits; and identifying and correcting errors in accounting.Interpret financial ratios for companies, efficiency ratios, leverage ratios and issues with financial statement analysis.Major topics include: introduction to accounting; financial statements; mechanics of the accounting cycle; adjusting accounts and preparing financial statements; internal controls; merchandising operations and inventory; receivables; completing the operating cycle; long-term assets; current and long-term liabilities; reporting and analyzing equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis and interpretation.Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the uses and application of financial accounting, the GAAP, and IFRS principles and provide examples for demonstration purposes; analyze specific environmental and theoretical structures affecting financial accounting: economic cost concepts, source documents, technology in accounting, ethics in accounting, and users of financial accounting statements; outline the components of the balance sheet, demonstrate the components of the income statement, and differentiate between the seven forms that an income statement can take; evaluate cash flows and the time value of money, incorporating the statement of expected cash flow using the correct formatting, net present value (NPV), and annuities; demonstrate their understanding of accounts receivables by performing the calculations for the maturity date as well as the amount of interest charged on the note; discriminate among the various factors affecting the need for controls in accounting and distinguish between variations in the recording of business transactions; demonstrate an understanding, with the aid of relevant examples, of the need for forecasting, break-even analysis, and cost accounting, in managerial decision making; summarize the six main financial ratios, the role played by each in global capital markets, and evaluate the effect of the ratios on decision making in the strategic/managerial planning process.

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons.Topics include: the dynamic business environment, practicing social responsibility and ethical behavior in business, economics and business, business in global markets, forms of business ownership, entrepreneurship and small business, managing and leading in business, leadership styles in business, organizational management, business production and operations, workplace productivity and motivation, basics of human resources, managing the employer-worker relationship, business marketing basics, product development and retailing, product distribution and supply chain management, pricing strategy in marketing, product promotion in business, MIS basics in business, implications of information technology, risk management in business, accounting basics, financial management in business, securities markets and business, and money and financial institutions.Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to compare and contrast the levels, roles, and functions of management; distinguish between modern theories of management, including quality management and systems management theory; break down quantitative management and the roles of branches such as operations management ; illustrate the types of planning and its function in management; model different types of organizations, including centralized and decentralized organizations; examine leadership and its role in organizations and the difference between a manager and a leader; analyze the role of motivation in the workplace and how managers affect motivation; illustrate the communication process and the role of organizational communication; analyze the decision making process and describe tools used to make informed decisions; outline the importance of business ethics in contemporary business; investigate controlling and its function in management; and relate the managerial functions in international organizations and characteristics of an international manager.Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: summarize the primary objective of human resource management (HRM), how it fits within an organization, ethics, and study its history; categorize the Classical Scientific School of Management and Fayol's theories on worker satisfaction and staff management; analyze the definition of job design and how empowerment and job design are connected; review hiring and staffing, recruitment, common selection methods, how to assess an organization's training needs, and find out about the different types and methods of employee training programs and new hire orientation; examine the benefits and uses of appraisals, performance appraisal types, and the uses of reliability and validity in assessment; compare and contrast direct and indirect compensation, common compensation systems, compensation equity, and mandatory and voluntary benefits; explain at-will employment, privacy, work-life balance, workplace stress, wage and income regulations, and safety; outline the history and purpose of labor relations, including the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), collective-bargaining, unions, strikes, lockouts, the executive orders of 19, and labor relations trends; distinguish the four global staffing approaches and expatriate staffing; and illustrate what Affirmative Action is through workplace diversity, ability and disability diversity, cultural, and age diversity.Topics include: overview of HRM field; personnel management; organizational theories and human resources; job analysis and design; staffing in organizations; training and development in organizations; performance appraisals; employee compensation issues; employment law and employee rights; labor relations; international human resource management; and current issues and trends in HRM.Courses consist of engaging, bite-sized video lessons that make concepts easy and fun to learn.